If My Business Is That Good Why Do not They Sign Up?

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That age old question that has baffled network marketers for years. They rehearse their script, wind themselves up and as soon as an unsuspecting victim comes along they spill it out and then can not believe why they did not sign them up on the spot.

Network marketing is perhaps the only business where one has to justify going after customers. In every other business, customers are sacred. Companies do everything they can to pursue and keep them.

Marks & Spencer for example, has built their own business by offering outrageously good customer service. But, how often have you heard, especially from people at the top of your heap, that it's a waste of time to go after customers? That the money is in recruiting business builders?

Where has that come from?

Why are customers at the low end of everyone's list of importance in the network marketing business? For some it's because income from customers looks like small potatoes compared to the big money a business builder might bring.

And the few people who get builders in their organizations are the ones showcased in front of the room. These big earners are the ones who have been fortunately enough to stumble upon a business builder or two, who brings in a whole organization of aspiring builders.

Soon there are thousands of people selling the dream to others, and everyone is buying product regularly so that they can be a "product of the product". And this rare top banana, at the top of the heap, gets a percentage of most all of it. That's why the income gets so big.

Nice work if you can get it.

However, everyone who's been in the business for a year or more knows the downside: The odds of getting an entrepreneur who really does something and lasts with it until they succeed, are almost as small as winning the lottery.

How many of you have succeeded in finding those entrepreneurs? And in keeping them?

For years, when I was building my various network marketing businesses, I too focused on finding aspiring marketers.

I would go after them with a vengeance, enjoying the "big money" for a while. But I had to work 10 to 12 hour days to sustain the income because most of them lasted less than three months. They'd sign up, buy their quota and were gone in a couple of months. Some would disappear in a week.

Most really were not business builders. They were mesmerized by the financial promise of the circles on the wall and my success. They forgot that I had been working at it relentlessly for years previously.

They discovered that they did not really enjoy selling, and their initial enthusiasm disappeared in the face of the unresponsive or unexpected sometimes nasty treatment they got from their friends, family, and the general marketplace.

In hindsight, 97% of the people I signed up ended up being just customers.

And I was getting them the hard way – by leading with the business. I did some research and found data from several large network companies showing that for every 100 people who regularly order a product or service for their own use, only two or three also sell the product.

Around 97 are just customers, not distributors, even though many were signed up as distributors. So, why not seek out customers to begin with? It's a less stressful and a more predictable way to build significant income.

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Source by Mike A Henry

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